Design Project Profile: Jade Ocean

Architect: Carlos Ott, Uruguay
Builder: Coscan Construction
Glass Fabricator: Viracon
Glazing Contractor: Permasteelisa

The Miami skyline is home to a gleaming condominium tower, Jade Ocean. The tower, owned by Fortune Development and designed by world-renowned architect Carlos Ott of Uruguay, has become what is believed to be the first impact-resistant condominium curtainwall in the country.

Although Jade Ocean is loaded with innovative design elements, from multi-story waterfalls to sunrise and sunset infinity pools, glass is the real star of the project. In fact, after seeing Carlos Ott’s concept, the first step Fortune Development took was to select a curtainwall engineer and glass fabricator – even before choosing a general contractor.  Permasteelisa North America, the world’s leading curtainwall manufacturer and Viracon, the country’s largest single-source glass fabricator, got the nod.

Due to an incredibly unique and colorful design, coupled with a need to meet Miami-Dade hurricane building codes, Fortune Development decided to make the glass and skin fabrication its top priority.

Ott’s design called for a 51-floor tower enveloped in a pure glass skin. Instead of a standard squared crown, Ott envisioned a radius curtainwall that arches back into the building. While most condominium towers consist of window wall systems, the design called for a pure, sparkling glass veneer.  “The architectural elements of the façade would not have been captured as eloquently with a window wall system,” says Andrew Richards, owner’s representative at Fortune International, who was highly involved in the design and glass selection process. “The curtainwall design allows the building to be viewed as planes rather than only three dimensionally.”

“While curtain wall is often used in buildings such as offices and hotels, condominiums are usually window wall,” adds Maria Caleyo, project manager at Permasteelisa North America.  “This is the first time we’ve worked on an impact condo curtainwall. Together with Viracon, we worked with the architectural team from the very beginning of the project to create the unique framing and glass system.”

Permasteelisa’s Miami team immediately set out to design the custom curtainwall system, which had to meet stringent hurricane code requirements and support durable impact resistant glass. While they focused on the frame, Viracon tackled the glass.

“With more than 300,000 square feet of external glass, selecting the right colors and coatings was critical,” says Jeff Rigot, Viracon’s architectural representative for Florida. “Not only did the glass need to create a very specific aesthetic, but it also needed to provide exceptional hurricane and energy performance and meet Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Turtle Codes.”

Architects and owners wanted the building to evoke a subtle “sparkle” effect and wanted occupants to have a comfortable living experience. With Viracon’s help, the team ultimately opted to use two colors of glass to create distinct vertical lines on the façade, while providing owners with an energy efficient living environment.

“Viracon was extremely helpful and provided numerous samples for evaluation,” says Richards. “Without their full cooperation, we may not have been able to achieve the results we did.”

Gray glass with a low-e coating, Viracon’s VH13-50 product, was chosen for bands which primarily enclose living units. With a visible light transmittance of 50 percent, the glass allows ample natural daylight to flow into the living spaces without flooding them with excessive light. The Low-E glass also provides excellent radiant heat reduction, or shading coefficient characteristics, to help improve energy performance. The Low-E coating is ideal for living spaces, as it allows for two-way vision and lower reflectivity. The coating gives the glass a flat or natural look, which provides a beautiful contrast to the other glass used in the building.

The gray bands are alternated with a royal blue reflective glass, Viracon’s VT-40 product, to add shimmer and shine. This reflective coating gives the glass a mirror-like appearance and reduces solar heat gain through high solar reflection. The VT-40 product adds a shiny, crisp aesthetic to the building’s exterior but still allows 40 percent light transmission for comfortable interior spaces.

Although creating a custom impact curtainwall system for the entire building was quite an undertaking, designing the radius curtainwall crown was a feat in itself. “The team at Permasteelisa designed and engineered a phenomenal structural steel membrane to support the innovative arched top,” says Rigot. “The striking shape, combined with Viracon’s VS9-08 royal blue glass with a highly reflective coating
will brilliantly light up the sky.”

A Saflex PVB interlayer was incorporated into the glass throughout the curtainwall to meet impact requirements. The protective interlayer was also incorporated into the sliding door systems created and installed by Continental Glass Systems in Miami.

In order to closely monitor and control the quality of the finished product, the entire curtainwall was pre-glazed at Permasteelisa’s Miami facility and brought to the job site in large trucks.

Reaction to the building has been very positive. “Everyone is very happy with the finished product,” says Caleyo. With the dynamic mix of colors, coatings and design, Jade Ocean is true gem in Miami.

Color Definition #1


WHITE – White is commonly associated with purity and innocence. White lacks colors of any kind. Since it lacks color of any kind, it is the most popular choice as a background color, as all other colors will be seen in sharp contrast. However, stark white is very cold and can, in some settings, appear almost blue. There are many different shades and tints of white, from cool whites to warm whites. By mixing cool whites with cool colors, and warm whites with warm colors, you will find the best blend. View Vanceva Whites

Introducing the 2010 World of Color Award Winners

Solutia Inc. is proud to announce the winners of the inaugural World of Color Awards™ – Inspired by Vanceva®. For the past four months, designers around the world have been submitting the projects they believe demonstrate the most innovative and creative uses of colored glass, made with Vanceva®, in the built environment.

Click here to see the winners!

Design Project Profile: Wolstein Research Center

Architect: Van Dijk Westlake Reed Leskosky Architects
Laminator: Standard Bent Glass Corp.

Remarkable innovations can be achieved when physicians and scientists collaborate. That’s exactly the goal at the Iris S. & Bert L. Wolstein Research Building, a biomedical research facility in the heart of the Case Western Reserve University. The extensive and creative use of glass welcomes physicians, scientists, and visitors alike and allows passerby to peer into the future of pioneering biomedical research.

The research facility features 332,000 square feet, is six stories tall with two additional floors below grade, and has the capacity for 900 research investigators.  As built, the Wolstein Research Building locates lab areas at the front of all floors, with plenty of clear glass to let natural light in and give the public a glimpse into the research environment. Offices and support space are located in the back half of the floor. At the building’s main entrance canopy, a striking laminated glass tower, created with unique glass shapes made with Solutia® Inc.’s Vanceva®, Advanced Solutions for Glass™ brand colored, metallic and textured interlayers, stretches 140 feet skyward on steel frame to the building’s roof.

According to Sue Errera at Standard Bent Glass Corporation, “The use of sparkling decorative glass at the building’s entrance is a wonderful complement to the pioneering research being conducted within the research center. The distinctive pattern on the tower emulates a DNA pattern, and is made even more dramatic by the use of white and blue Vanceva interlayers, coupled with PPG Starfire and PPG Azurlite.”

The glass treatment at the main entrance is made up of 1,600 square feet of glass.  None of the composite’s 52 irregularly shaped pieces are alike.  A striking color palette includes blues, greens and rose.  The irregular pieces range in size from 60 to 130 inches with most one-half-inch thick (one-quarter inch over one-quarter inch ). “This was the best choice for the project because laminated glass offers the needed resiliency to stand up to its western exposure and will easily withstand the inherent sun, wind, dust and safety requirements,” added Errera.

Open Paradox: KAIST IT Convergence Center

Courtesy of jury member Jeeyong An

The proposal for the IT Convergence Center for KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) aims to provide a truly multi-disciplinary research and educational environment for the institute. Located on the sloped East Campus Plaza of KAIST, the building allows free-flowing interaction between students and faculty of multiple academic disciplines as well as with the remaining school population and the public, fostering an atmosphere of creativity and openness.

The placement of the building takes into consideration its relationship with the campus as a whole, allowing people to approach easily from all neighboring areas of the campus, thus providing the previously neglected north east corner of the campus with a new lively presence. The open plaza features colorful landscape with various embedded programs such as the convergence plaza and an amphitheater which sit on the sloped site.


Image courtesy of Ginseng Chicken Architecture P.C.

The building itself is largely divided into three zones, the educational zone located at the top, the research zone occupying the center, and the public zone on the ground level. Within the research zone students labs located on the north wing are separated by a bridged atrium space with the faculty offices of the south wing.  The bridged atrium allows for less emphasis on the direct, sometimes even restrictive, affiliation between student and professor and encourages across-fertilization between different disciplines and research teams. The atrium also allows for the research activities taking place within the zone to be visible by the public visiting the building on the ground level, resulting in a dynamic and mutually beneficial, educational relationships between all three types of occupants (faculty, students and visiting public) within the building.

Design Architect:
Ginseng Chicken Architecture P.C.
Partners: Jeeyong An, Sang Hwa Lee
Project Team: Giyoung Park, Unchung Na, So Rae Yoo, Cheryl Gourley, Ji Yoon Oh, Ulyong Moon, Sieun Lee
116 W 23rd St 5FL, New York, NY, 10011 / www.ginsengchicken.net

Local Architect:
ILKUN Architects & Engineers Ltd.
Pricipal: Il-In Hwang
Project Team: Sung-Jung Chough, Hye Jin Choi, Hyun Hee An
ILKUN Building 800-4 Bangbae Dong, Seocho Gu, Seoul 137-060, Korea / www.ilkun.com

Consultants:
Nito Structural Design Co., Ltd.,
Sun Structural Engineering
Woowon Engineering
Saem Landscape Architects
Gyoung Tak Park, Landscape Architect

Light + Color = Chakra (Part 5, 6 & 7)


Courtesy of jury member Denise Turner

Chakra, or energy center, is a Sanscrit word, mean ing “Wheel of Light”. It refers to the body’s seven major energy centers which are positioned along the spinal column. Each chakra (pronounced “shah-krah”), has a unique function that corresponds to a specific color and essence, beginning with the Root Chakra, at the base of spine, and continuing up to the Crown Chakra, on top of the head.   These energy portholes regulate the flow of energy in and out of our body. When one chakra malfunctions, its neighboring chakras are also affected, causing illness. Chroma Therapy assists in rebalancing the body to its optimum wellness.

Here’s an explanation of what each chakra does, and how chroma and aroma therapy supports them. We’ve also chosen a Vanceva® Color Studio for laminated glass color to represent each of the chakra’s below:

Chakra5Fifth Chakra – located at base of throat.

Color: Cobalt Blue

Essence: Rose

Association: Communication, speech, self-expression, creativity, inner peace, hope, loyalty and truth

Controls: Thyroid gland, neck, larynx, trachea, which manufacturer’s thyroxin that controls the body’s metabolic rate

Feeling nervous about doing a presentation? Then wear a blue suit and anoint yourself with the essence of Rose. You will speak more clearly and your audience will be more receptive.

Fifth Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Caribbean Blue (Color Code: 6666)

Solar Transmittance: 0.42

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.26

Shading Coefficient: 0.68

Sixth Chakra - located in the center of forehead.

Color: Indigo

Essence: Jasmine

Association: Psychic awareness, intuitive thought, spiritual insight and clairvoyance which are the ability to “see the big picture”

Controls: Pituitary glands and eyes. The pituitary glands influence growth, metabolism and general body chemistry, such as hormones that produce contractions in child birth and release milk from breasts.

Having a creative block? Then paint your studio Indigo and Violet and bring in the essence of Jasmine. This will get your creative juices flowing again.

Sixth Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Indigo (Vanceva code: 7567)

Solar Transmittance: 0.21

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.05

Shading Coefficient: 0.46

Seventh Chakra - located above the head.

Color: Violet

Essence: Sandalwood

Association: Spiritual connection, transcending of self, bliss and psychic inspiration

Controls:Pineal glands, skin, cerebral cortex.  The pineal glands produce melatonin which regulates the body’s internal “Body Clock”. Melatonin has anti-aging properties; it affects pituitary thyroid, adrenals and gonads.

Desiring a more blissful meditation ? Create your sacred space in hues of violet and bring in the essence of Sandalwood; they will calm your anxious nerves and allow you to connect with the higher source.

Seventh Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Violet (Color code: 5165)

Solar Transmittance: 0.51

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.31

Shading Coefficient: 0.74

The colors in light, like those achieved using laminated colored glass, have a deeper and more penetrating effect than pigments used in paint. Light makes an impact unconsciously, directly on the body cells, whereas paint colors affect only the conscious mind. Colored lights and natural daylight through colored glass can be powerful in milder color schemes.

Light + Color = Chakra (Part 3 & 4)


Courtesy of jury member Denise Turner

Chakra, or energy center, is a Sanscrit word, meaning “Wheel of Light”. It refers to the body’ s seven major energy centers which are positioned along the spinal column. Each chakra (pronounced “shah-krah”), has a unique function that corresponds to a specific color and essence, beginning with the Root Chakra, at the base of spine, and continuing up to the Crown Chakra, on top of the head. These energy portholes regulate the flow of energy in and out of our body. When one chakra malfunctions, its neighboring chakras are also affected, causing illness. Chroma Therapy assists in rebalancing the body to its optimum wellness.

Here’s an explanation of what each chakra does, and how chroma and aroma therapy supports them. We’ve also chosen a Vanceva® Color Studio for laminated glass color to represent each of the chakra’s below:

Chakra3Third Chakra - located at the solar plexus.

Color: Yellow

Essence: Cinnamon

Association: Self-will, intellect and communication, confidence, attention to detail, academic achievement, discipline and mental discrimination

Controls: Pancreas, spleen, digestive system, muscles and adrenals

Having difficulty getting people to communicate ? Yellow the essence of cinnamon are excellent for counseling offices and conference rooms. They help open the lines of communication.

Third Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Sahara Sun (Color Layer: 0004)

Solar Transmittance: 0.63

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.78

Shading Coefficient: 0.83

Chakra4Fourth Chakra - located in middle of chest.

Color: Emerald Green and sometimes Pink

Essence: Lavender

Association: heart, love, peace, hope, balance, healing compassion for others and for self, forgiveness and growth

Controls: Heart, lungs, chest, circulation, thymus. The thymus produces hormones which stimulates growth.

Feeling anxious or angry? To reduce stress and to evoke the feeling of balance and harmony, paint your environment Green or Pink and bring in the essence of Lavender. They reduce stress and to evoke the feeling of balance.  Pink slows down the heart and removes all aggressive behavior, which is why many correctional institutions are painted light pink.

Fourth Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Spring Green (Color Code: 8678)

Solar Transmittance: 0.32

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.26

Shading Coefficient: 0.60

World of Color Awards Webisode #2: The 2010 Vanceva Color Forecast

Aimee Davis, Solutia’ s Architectural Market Manager for the America s, walks through the 2010 Vanceva Color Forecast.

Design Project Profile: Charing Cross Road

Courtesy of jury member Andrew Moor

127 Charing Cross Road is an office building immediately adjacent to Foyle’s Bookshop, an international bibliophile landmark in the heart of London’s Soho district.  As part of the refurbishment of this building the architect, in collaboration with Andrew Moor Associates, proposed the installation of forty external dichroic glass fins, each eight metres (25 feet) tall. The south side, seen in this picture, has thirty of these identical fins, made in three sections and tapered at the top and bottom.

127 Charing Cross Road

These fins are laminated and toughened with dichroic glass. Each fin appears as a slightly different colour to its neighbour, creating a gradating rainbow of colour from both the interior and the exterior, colours that constantly change as the sun comes out or goes in, and the direction of the incoming light sources changes throughout the day and night.  As the viewer moves, so the colours change, altered by your shifting angle of incidence.

The final result is both startling, yet curiously soothing. The colours blend so smoothly into each other, changing slightly as you move past them creating a dramatic but calming effect.

Light + Color = Chakra

Courtesy of jury member Denise Turner

Chakra, or energy center, is a Sanscrit word, mean ing “Wheel of Light”. It refers to the body’s seven major energy centers which are positioned along the spinal column. Each chakra (pronounced “shah-krah”), h as a unique function that corresponds to a specific color and essence, beginning with the Root Chakra, at the base of spine, and continuing up to the Crown Chakra, on top of the head. These energy portholes regulate the flow of energy in and out of our body. When one chakra malfunctions, its neighboring chakras are also affected, causing illness. Chroma Therapy assists in rebalancing the body to its optimum wellness.

Here’s an explanation of what each chakra does, and how chroma and aroma therapy supports them. We’ve also chosen a Vanceva® Color Studio for laminated glass color to represent each of the chakra’s below:

chakra1First Chakra – located at the base of the spine

Color: Red

Essence: Cedar

Association: Strength, courage, health, vigor, sexuality, physical survival instinct, will, and vitality

Controls: Adrenal glands, produce adrenalin, which is essential for “Fight or Flight”. They secrete a variety of hormones such as those that regulate the metabolism of fats, proteins, carbohydrates and the ones that control and balance salt.

If you are a procrastinator or in a sluggish time of your life, paint your room in Red. Bring in the essence of Cedar and get ready to take off!

First Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Deep Red (Color Layer: 000C)

Solar Transmittance: 0.36

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.14

Shading Coefficient: 0.59

chakra2Second Chakra – located below the naval.

Color: Orange

Essence: Gardenia

Association: Sexuality, passion, confidence, enthusiasm, striving and self-motivation

Controls: Reproductive organs, bladder, circulatory system, prostrate, womb, ovaries and testes

Designing a room for people to socialize and play in ? Paint it in Orange and bring in the essence of Gardenia and let the party begin!  Orange and Red stimulate the appetite (which is why they’re used in fast-food restaurants). They can work well in a kitchen or dining room, unless you’re watching your weight. If you are, you might consider using green, a color associated with health and harmony.

Second Chakra in Glass:

Vanceva® Tangerine (Color Layer: 000E)

Solar Transmittance: 0.54

Visible Light Transmittance: 0.41

Shading Coefficient: 0.75

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